Buying Guide

Regarding Rules and Regulations

California is known for its opposition on people’s right to bear arms. The state government is doing all it can to limit and deter people from buying guns. When buying your gun, pay special attention to the following:

CA Handgun Roster:

Visit http://certguns.doj.ca.gov/ to find out if the handgun/pistol you want to buy is available for the state of California (If purchasing from California.)

10 Round Magazine

California restricted magazine capacities to be 10 rounds or below; anything above 10 rounds cannot be sold, gifted, or transferred to others under current laws.  Any firearms bought from our shop will have its magazines with any capacity over 10 rounds: Cut magazine spring and pinned to fit a maximum of 10 rounds.

Assault Weapon:

Under the most current CA Assault Weapon ban, Any firearm without a mag-block can be CA compliant by making it featureless with a non-adjustable stock and a pistol grip fin.  Having a mag-block allows the configurations for adjustable stocks, no pistol grip fin and forward-grip.

Conceal Carry:

California does not recognize Constitutional Carry, where citizens do not have to have a permit to carry conceal. In addition, each county holds different policies toward conceal carry. For instance, residents of LA County will have next to no chance to obtain a CCW, but residents of Orange, San Bernardino, and other neighboring counties will have the chance to obtain a permit. Always check your county laws before carry.

Hello, my name is Eryck and I am the person handling all the online sales and any marketing related stuff here.

The purpose of this post is to give you guys a more personal suggestion regarding choosing the first gun. I mean, sure, there are many sources where you can find guides published by experts of industry, but here, I am just going to give my honest opinions based on my experiences. If you are looking for a more expert-opinioned guide, go to PewPewTactical’s Beginner Guide; if you want to read what a not-so-expert person offers, keep reading.

There are many reasons why people purchase guns. As a representative at EXA, we get the following answers when asked “What makes you want to buy a gun?”*

  • Home Defense (HD) – These are the people who have suffered from home invasions or other types of crimes, or have people they know who became the victims and are not willing to become the victim again.
  • Personal Defense – Like the people looking for guns in HD, these people are not willing to become victims in the future.
  • Target Shooting – These are the people looking to buy a gun because they simply want to learn to shoot
  • Competition – These are the people who saw competitions such as 3 Guns, IPSC, and others, and they want to do similar things.
  • 2nd Amendment – These are the people who believe the right to bear arms is the same as the right to free speech, and they want to get a gun “because I can.”
  • I’ve always liked guns – These are the people who like guns in the beginning, and now they are finally able to purchase their own guns, so they want to buy a gun (or more).

 

My Reason To Buy Guns

For me, my reason to buy a gun is a mixture of a few of above. My reasons to buy guns started out from “I’ve always liked guns” and “Home Defense,” but branch out from HD, PD, Target Shooting, 2nd Amendment, and I’ve always liked guns.

I grew up in Taiwan, and the only people there who have guns are the police and the gangsters. So the closest I could get there were airsoft guns; sure, it was fun, but it’s still not as good as the real deal. Fast forward to when I moved back to the States; I was living with my aunt for the first few years after my return, and she was extremely anti-gun. She even thought that the gun fight outside of her house further proved her point, even when the police showed up 30 minutes after the shooting ended. So that’s my mindset when I finally moved out and bought my first gun.

Over the years as I started to shoot more and educate myself more about guns, it went from defense to “I want to perfect my shooting skills” to “the 2nd Amendment guarantees my right, so why not?”

But still, when I look to buy guns, I always ask myself this question: “What is the purpose of this purchase?” And that, my friends, wasn’t the case when I bought my first gun.

My Mistake

My first gun experience wasn’t pleasant at all. I went on Calguns to look for the cheapest gun I could find, and I found a Smith & Wesson SW40VE, the early, early model of the SD40VE. My gun expert friends did warn me about the terrible trigger and the Glock-wannabe design, but I couldn’t listen because it’s so cheap. I got it for a little bit over $200 after DROS!

So I bought the gun without test firing the gun first, and it turned out it was a bad decision. The trigger pull was too long and too heavy, and the ammunition was expensive. I regretted it, and I then bought a Beretta 92FS Brigadier soon after to replace it.

The lesson:

Don’t rush into a purchase because it’s cheap; always, ALWAYS, go to your range and rent the gun to see if you like it. Also consider the ammo costs and maintenance costs as well. I strongly recommend starting on guns that take 9mm ammos, such as Glock 17 and 19, or Beretta 92FS.

What Guns Do I Recommend?

There are three main categories of firearms: handgun, rifle, and shotgun.

Handgun:

My recommended handgun for all purpose is Glock 17 and 19, and Beretta 92FS.

Glock made the list because they are reliable, cost-effective, and easy to maintain. I recommend the 92 because it is also reliable and easy to maintain.

A Glock 17 or 19 should cost you around $500 new, while a 92 should cost you around $700-800.

Rifle:

Rifles are more complicated, as there are two routes that buyers can take: complete gun or DIY build. For first time buyers, I recommend buying a complete gun so you don’t have to scratch your head when you buy parts.

I recommend Smith & Wesson M&P15, which should cost you around $700. It is the least expensive complete gun you can get new, and it is accurate and reliable right out of box.

Shotgun:

For shotguns, I recommend a Mossberg 500 or Remington 870. Both of these should cost you less than $500 out the door, and are easy to operate and reliable as well.

Regarding Rules and Regulations

California is known for its opposition on people’s right to bear arms. The state government is doing all it can to limit and deter people from buying guns. When buying your gun, pay special attention to the following:

CA Handgun Roster:

This is a list of handguns that civilians can buy; if you want to buy a new gun, it must be on this list. If it’s not on the list, you can’t buy it new even though it is available for Americans in other parts of the USA. Law Enforcement can purchase guns that are not on the roster.

One way to get off roster guns is through Private Party Transfer, which will be discussed later.

10 Round Magazine

California restricted magazine capacities to be 10 rounds or below; anything above 10 rounds cannot be sold, gifted, or transferred to others under current laws. At the time of writing, it is still okay to possess standard capacity magazines (magazines that were designed and built to hold more than 10 rounds).

Assault Weapon:

Under the most current CA Assault Weapon rules, anything that looks like a regular AR and AK are banned. New AR and AK must be CA Compliant to be legal.

Conceal Carry:

California does not recognize Constitutional Carry, where citizens do not have to have a permit to carry conceal. In addition, each county holds different policies toward conceal carry. For instance, residents of LA County will have next to no chance to obtain a CCW, but residents of Orange, San Bernardino, and other neighboring counties will have the chance to obtain a permit. Always check your county laws before carry.